Drew Barn.jpg
Sunflower County Seed Barn
Sunflower County, MS

This barn is the location where Emmett Till was beaten and, most likely, murdered. The barn is on what was then Leslie Milam's (the brother of J.W. Milam and Roy Bryant) plantation.

According to the testimonies of Willie Reed, his grandfather Add Reed, and Mandy Bradley during the murder trial, this barn was where Emmett Till was taken the night that he was kidnapped. Willie Reed testified to seeing a white pickup with four white men and three black men--one on the floor and two sitting on the rails beside him--pull up to the barn. Soon after, he heard what sounded like a person being badly beaten inside of the barn. Willie Reed then saw J.W. Milam come out of the barn, get a drink of water, and return to the barn. (1) Add Reed supported Willie Reed's testimony, claiming to have seen J.W. Milam and the white truck. Mandy Bradley testified that she saw the men going in and out of the barn around 6:30-7:00am. She saw the men back the truck into the shed, then drive away. (2) 

The testimonies of Willie Reed, Add Reed, and Mandy Bradley had the potential to upset the Emmett Till murder trial, as their testimony revealed that the murder actually occurred in Sunflower County, not in Tallahatchie County, which would shift the jurisdiction of the courts. However, the trial remained in Tallahatchie County.

Following their testimony, Willie Reed, Add Reed, and Mandy Bradley all had to flee Mississippi. 

This site has often been written out of the Emmett Till narrative due to William Bradford Huie's article in LOOK Magazine. Roy Bryant and J.W. Milam could not be tried again for Emmett Till's murder due to double jeopardy laws, but the other people involved in the murder, namely Leslie Milam who owned the barn where the murder took place, could still be prosecuted. Huie needed signed consent forms from each person involved in the murder to publish the article, so Huie re-wrote the story of the murder to involve only Milam and Bryant, changing the location of the murder to a barn near Glendora, MS in Tallahatchie County.  As Dave Tell et al. note, "Although it is wrong, Huie’s story has been so influential that every single map published on the Till murder between the publication of LOOK’s article in January 1956 and 2005 left the Milam Plantation off the map entirely." (3)

The barn is now under private ownership. 

Footnotes

  1. Devery Anderson, Emmett Till: The Murder That Shocked the World and Propelled the Civil Rights Movement, University Press of Mississippi, 2015, pp. 128-9.

  2. ibid, p. 133.

  3. Dave Tell, Davis Houck, Pablo Correa & the Emmett Till Memorial Commission, "Seed Barn, Milam Plantation," Emmett Till Memory Project, 2021, https://tillapp.emmett-till.org/items/show/4.